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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
NSA violated a FISA Court order by regularly searching Section 215 phone records database without meeting the standards imposed by the Court. These repeated violations led to several reprimands by the FISA Court for what the FISA Court called a systemic noncompliance by the government. The Court has also admonished the government for making series of substantial misrepresentations to the Court.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander (answering Sen. Flake 5 yr. data scrubbed?): Within the Executive Order, 12333 metadata repositories, it depends on the size of the repository and the type of data that’s being done. But generally speaking it's five years. There may be pieces of information that we retain longer that are intelligence value overseas that is different than the ones we have in the United States. But that's all that NSA has in those areas.
Jeff Flake
U.S. Senator, R-Arizona
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Flake: I understand foreign is handled differently. But if you have metadata that’s collected under separate authorities, not just 215, is that bunched together in a way that it’s retained beyond 5 years, how do you separate it? Do you hold it separately. How does that work? Alexander: So NSA, I don’t know of any other programs that would collect metadata in the United States outside of 215. We don’t have any that I know of. And none have come up.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander (answering Sen. Flake metadata kept more than 5 years?) : From my perspective. Those would be with other agencies. Clapper: (Overseas) Alexander: The overseas is the one I explained. So, does that make sense? Flake: OK Alexander: So I don’t have any other telephone. There was an old program that we talked about. You know, that was stopped a few years back and all that data was destroyed. That was on email. So we don’t have any. Flake: There’s no more programs that I know of, you would know of them. Alexander: Hopefully, so. Especially after the last three and a half months.
Christopher Coons
U.S. Senator, D-Delaware
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Coons: the very fact that the NSA can tell so much about a target through detail analysis of non-content bulk data, metadata, indicates to me that there is some privacy interest at stake. Maybe not a Constitutional privacy interest, given the current Constitutional doctrine, but a private interest in the sense that the NSA can cobble together, through these random threads, can weave a profile on a person that can ultimately contain quite private details. Shouldn’t Congress be concerned about protecting that sort of privacy interest against unwarranted intrusion?
Christopher Coons
U.S. Senator, D-Delaware
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Coons:I will repeat Senator Franken’s solid point that you’ve made some very significant progress in terms of transparency and commitment to response to the Congressional oversight, but temporary changes in policy and practice do not provide lasting assurance. Changes in statute will. Clapper: I completely agree with that. That if these changes whatever they are, are embedded in law, that would instantiate a degree of permanence that our doing it administratively would not.
Ted Cruz
U.S. Senator, R-Texas
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Cruz: When asked about whether the Agency wants “the records of all americans” you testified “I believe it is in the nation's best interest to put all the phone records into a lock box that we can search when the nation needs to do it.” Besides phone records, what other records of all American citizens do you believe the federal government should be collecting? Alexander: I cannot think of any right now. And there has been. So thanks Senator for that question.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander: bulk records that we would need, like the phone. I do think as we look at the phone data we’re going to have to look at how that changes as we bring mobility in. And that has been the question of it. So we released to the intell committees toda,y clarifications so they understood the difference on locational data and those requirements. I do think that right now we’re going to have to evolve as the threat evolves but I cannot think of any. That was a long winded, I can’t think of any. i apologize.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander: As NSA previously reported to the Senate House intelligence oversight Committees, NSA does not collect locational information under section 215 of the Patriot Act. In 2010 and 2011 NSA received samples in order to test the ability of it’s systems to handle the data format but that data was not used for any other purposes and was never available for intelligence analysis purposes. In a 25 June 2013 closed hearing with the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, NSA promised to notify the Congress before any locational data was collected
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
Alexander: In the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court’s most recent opinion, I think it’s called footnote number 5 on the program, the government would also be required to seek the Court’s approval of the production of locational data before acquiring it, under this program. I would just say that this may be something that is a future requirement for the country but it is not right now because when we identify a number we can give it to the FBI. When they get their probable cause then they can get the locational data that they need. And that’s the reason we stopped in 2011.
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